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Access Cities Challenges

Access Cities aims to strengthen sustainable urban development in five project cities in four countries.

cat-icon Vesterbrogade, Copenhagen, Denmark

Acción Colectiva

Capacitación a líderes locales y herramientas digitales para movilizar

cat-icon Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico

Art of Data Exhibit

The Art of Data exhibit represented a unique visual perspective on the data that drives decisions and improvements in Kansas City.

Boston CityScore

CityScore is an initiative designed to inform the Mayor and city managers about the overall health of the City at a moment’s notice by aggregating key performance metrics into one number.

cat-icon 1 City Hall Square, Boston, MA, United States

Calgary’s noise-sensing network

Calgary’s LoRaWAN — a long-range, low power digital wireless network — sensors will be used to categorize noises like gun shots, trains, construction and road noise through the work of a government partnership.

cat-icon Calgary, AB, Canada

Cities Coalition for Digital Rights

We, the undersigned cities, formally come together to form the Cities Coalition for Digital Rights, to protect and uphold human rights on the internet at the local and global level.

Cities of the Future

Each episode explores one idea or innovation that will transform cities.

cat-icon 10 Hudson Yards, New York, NY 10001, USA

City Data Sharing Toolkit

Future Cities Catapult has developed a City Data Sharing Toolkit. The toolkit includes tools, approaches and resources for local authorities sharing non-personal data.

City Of Tomorrow

It explores how different stakeholders in the Smart City ecosystem can come together to build safer, more efficient and sustainable cities of the future.

cat-icon Amsterdam, Netherlands

CityLab Berlin

Wir wollen einen einzigartigen Ort für Kreative, Entwicklerinnen und Tech-Initiativen schaffen, um zusammen mit der Verwaltung, Wissenschaft und Unternehmen zukunftsweisend zusammenzuarbeiten.

Computer vision uncovers predictors of physical urban change

We develop a computer vision method to measure changes in the physical appearances of neighborhoods from street-level imagery. We correlate the measured changes with neighborhood characteristics to determine which characteristics predict neighborhood improvement. We find that both education and population density predict improvements in neighborhood infrastructure, in support of theories of human capital agglomeration. Neighborhoods with better initial appearances experience more substantial upgrading, as predicted by the tipping theory of urban change. Finally, we observe more improvement in neighborhoods closer to both city centers and other physically attractive neighborhoods, in agreement with the invasion theory of urban sociology. Our results show how computer vision techniques, in combination with traditional methods, can be used to explore the dynamics of urban change.Which neighborhoods experience physical improvements? In this paper, we introduce a computer vision method to measure changes in the physical appearances of neighborhoods from time-series street-level imagery. We connect changes in the physical appearance of five US cities with economic and demographic data and find three factors that predict neighborhood improvement. First, neighborhoods that are densely populated by college-educated adults are more likely to experience physical improvements—an observation that is compatible with the economic literature linking human capital and local success. Second, neighborhoods with better initial appearances experience, on average, larger positive improvements—an observation that is consistent with “tipping” theories of urban change. Third, neighborhood improvement correlates positively with physical proximity to the central business district and to other physically attractive neighborhoods—an observation that is consistent with the “invasion” theories of urban sociology. Together, our results provide support for three classical theories of urban change and illustrate the value of using computer vision methods and street-level imagery to understand the physical dynamics of cities.

Congress on New Urbanism

The premiere national event on building better places

cat-icon Congress For the New Urbanism, 1720 N Street Northwest, Downtown, Washington, DC 20036, USA

Curbie

With curbside delivery on the rise, get a quick free tool to help you know when customers arrive to pickup their order.

CurbLR

Enable cities and companies to communicate clearly about curb regulations to enable better analysis, planning, and management of public space

Democratic Innovation in Megacities

NDI is partnering with Living Cities—an organization that harnesses the collective power of the world’s largest foundations and financial institutions to get dramatically better results for low-income urban residents—on a research initiative to explore the innovative ways that megacity governments are strengthening urban democracy.

cat-icon NDI, Massachusetts Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC, USA

Digital Cities

Examining the overall technology programs and plans of the city with awards presented concurrently with the National League of Cities conference held each November.

cat-icon United States